Creating Relevance Across Your Omnichannel Strategy

Featured at: REIMAGINE BIOPHARMA

Filming Date: April 15, 2021

Transcription

Frank Dolan
We’re all looking for that competitive advantage. We all feel like we are in this data rich world, but we’re feeling a little knowledge poor. There are opportunities to leverage tools, technology, data analysis to transform your brand. And if you’re a leader in the life sciences industry, the pressure is on to deliver this year. So you’ve got to level up and take things to the next level. I’m really, really excited to share the stage once again with Hans Kaspersetz of Arteric and Relevate.

Frank Dolan
Hans, It’s great to see again. I just want to say welcome.

Hans Kaspersetz
Thanks, Frank. And it’s great to be a part of the program again. I get really, really a lot out of it. I think yesterday’s panel was remarkable and looking forward to sharing a little bit of wisdom today with the team.

Frank Dolan
Well, wisdom we need, sir, because there’s a lot, we want to have competitive advantage like I shared before. But with everything that we’ve been through as an industry in the last year and thinking about how to, literally how do we connect with our customers. It’s made us rethink a lot of things. And I’ve mentioned this before. I think we’re in a very unique window of opportunity in the biopharma and medtech space, in particular for marketers when it comes to are we going to really understand if we’re doing the right things. Like how do we measure what matters?

Frank Dolan
What’s the real customer experience. If we’re omni channel, that’s neat, but what does that mean? Does that mean that we’re playing the same song, but starting at different seconds from all the different speakers, and we’re actually annoying our customer. Like how do we get, derive real insights of what’s going on? So you’re going to take us on a journey today with some really cool approaches and analyses. I’m really looking forward to it. So what are we about to learn, Hans?

Hans Kaspersetz
I think there’s two things that we’re going to look at today. Number one, the impact of local and how health care is really local and thinking through that. And then what’s that relationship to language and sort of competitive dominance. Right. And how can a Challenger brand come into the market and become dominant against a well-placed brand, right, through very, very smart use of language and digital tactics. And, you know, that’s about it.

Frank Dolan
That’s it. That’s alot. We have to, they say, you eat the elephant one bite at a time. So this is, these are big topics and it’s a high stakes environment. So I believe you got some visuals to help support us. So I’m going to to bring those up and let’s go on that journey together.

Hans Kaspersetz
Thanks, Frank, so first of all, thanks for attending the session. It’s I don’t know, I just find it really exciting to be able to share this stuff with with people and hopefully open their minds.

Hans Kaspersetz
So what we’re going to talk about today is discovering how a Challenger brand achieved topical dominance against a category establishing brand. And we’re really going to look at a couple of things. One, we’re going to look at how the algorithms work and some original research that Relevate, Arteric has done to determine where you want to rank and how you want to rank. We’re going to take a look at how you can use language and language variant. So different forms of saying the same thing to achieve a dominant position in chief authority.

Hans Kaspersetz
And then we’re going to talk about some of the results that we’ve achieved through that. So it’s about twenty three slides. You’re going to have to suffer through this for about 40, 40 minutes or so I’m going to try to move pretty quick and keep it entertaining. So the first place I want to start is something that’s really, really excited. If you’ve been a part of Frank’s events before, you’ve heard the name Arteric many, many times. I’m really fortunate and our team is really fortunate to have to have had a strategic merger with Relevate back in December.

Hans Kaspersetz
And that took us from being a 50 person organization to a 150 person organization and lastly and combined two really magical things. One, Relavate has been doing local marketing, local content marketing, at national scale for about a decade. And Arteric has been doing digital agency of record work and original sort of digital production and R&D work for a little bit longer than that, about 17 years. And so when you bring these two brands together, we now have the capability, the market intelligence to look at the market, look at our one point two million physicians in our database and look at how they’re behaving in the market and then look at the language that’s being used in the market through our lexical analysis and digital multichannel capabilities and come together and build campaigns and strategies and tactics that really, really outperform.

Hans Kaspersetz
And that’s pretty exciting. And that’s really where I wanted to start today, just as a sort of an introduction to some exciting news. Moving past that right, there’s one of the things that Covid really, really illustrated for us this year is that health care is local, right. And we saw that when we saw the very the variances in how different markets behaved as Covid moved through the market. We saw different behaviors from physicians, different behaviors from patients.

Hans Kaspersetz
And what that really highlighted for us was something we already knew based on the data, but that brands really suffer the tyranny of averages, right they. Look at the entire country as sort of a unit generally, at least the marketing teams do, the commercial teams and then they try to slather the entire country with peanut butter. And what happens is the message resonates in some places and it just doesn’t resonate in other places. And they have a hard time figuring out why.

Hans Kaspersetz
And it was really interesting. In the first session yesterday, one of the speakers talked about how a jingle failed because it didn’t actually reflect the audience’s behavior needs and demographics, to be quite frank. And so really being able to look at the data in a unique way. Figure out how different markets react, figuring out what’s the language that needs to be used in each of those markets, what are the sort of how do you localize the content in a way that’s relevant and then how do you deliver it?

Hans Kaspersetz
Right. And that was the probably the biggest thing that we learned last year. It was, it really reinforced things that we knew. And as we move through 2021 into 2022, and we think about the need to do sort of with a lot of Challenger brands coming to market, how do we do asymmetric launches, how do we out-compete well established brands in the market? Well, one of the ways is to do this sort of local content marketing at national scale.

Hans Kaspersetz
And where does this where does this happen? So everything we’re going to talk to talk about today is really applicable across the entire sort of commercialization, digital ecosystem. Everything from your sources and your drivers, like SEO, SEM system, your display advertising, your programatic to all of your destination’s, website content, ICVAs, outbound email, etc. All the way to the stuff on the on the right, which is your support. Mechanisms for once, people have engaged with your brand, and that includes your call center work, your outbound email, your EHR as you start, it gets all that kind of stuff.

Hans Kaspersetz
And using the right language and using language that’s reflective of the way the audience speaks is really important in order to drive engagement. So, you know, Frank asked the question before this before this session, what is lexical analysis? And I just want to take a second and talk about that. Lexical analysis is the science and the art of analyzing the way people use language to communicate. And for us, it’s really about identifying very small variances in the way language is used.

Hans Kaspersetz
Small turns of phrase, you know, the different way acronyms are written, in order to do a better job of engaging with those audiences. And for us, that’s about doing it at scale. Right. So how do we build tools? How do we build machine learning tools that are based on natural language understanding and natural language processing to accelerate this work and do it rapidly and at scale. So the thing that triggered this area of research for us was in 2016 we were working with a billion dollar brand.

Frank Dolan
And we were doing search engine optimization and digital publishing for them and we were analyzing what was happening in the marketplace and we took a look at about 50 thousand customer interaction, searches for their brand. And we analyzed and pulled out all the questions and then we went to Google and we started to search for those questions. And what we discovered was that while the brand would rank content against the question, only four percent of the time was the right answer. And this was a really startling sort of discovery, because previous to that, everybody was just happy that you write any content at all.

Hans Kaspersetz
Nobody was like, is it exactly the right content? And so it really transformed how we worked with brands and how we brought content to market. Right. Because it’s not enough just to have the content in the search engine and have it accessible to users. But it is very much about getting the exact right content in front of the user, satisfying their query intent and ensuring that they get the answer that they need, because users only go to one point, one Web pages, generally.

Hans Kaspersetz
Right. So if you don’t serve up the right answer on the first try, it’s really unlikely they’re going to dig through your website looking for the right answer. And so that’s why we built these tools. One of the tools we built is called the word embedding engine. Basically, it’s a crawler. It goes out, will crawl an arbitrary amount of content off of the web, and then it breaks down all of that content into two things.

Hans Kaspersetz
One, there’s a topic modular, so we can see all the topics that emerge out of that content. And then two, there’s a noun cluster identification tool that helps us to understand all of the phrases that are present and how important those phrases are in the content. And so that’s what we’re going to talk about now. We’ve done this work for a number of brands that you would recognize here over the years, we’ve found really, really important insights for these brands.

Hans Kaspersetz
I can’t talk about what the insights are for each brand, but I promise you that they do move the brand, right. They do result in measurable sort of changes in how the brand engages with their audiences. And at this point, we feel like these are proven processes that we’re talking about. So if you’re wondering who does this apply to, does this apply to me and really there’s at least six groups that it applies to. Are you launching a Challenger brand?

Hans Kaspersetz
Are you working on a brand etension extension? Do you have new indications coming to market? And you have to figure out how to communicate about the new indications, while preserving your reach and engagement on your old indications. Are you wondering how competitors content, channel strategy and brand strategy is achieving results? I think that’s one of the ones where where we learn the most. Are you wondering about your own brand positioning and engagement, how do audiences see your brand, what do they hear from you?

Hans Kaspersetz
And how does the content that you’re producing engage with them? You know, this is often one of the reasons that we get called. You’re not meeting forecasts, so you want to cycle out your old agency and bring somebody in new who has new insight and ideas and insights. And then finally, and this is something that both Relevant and Arteric have enjoyed for a long time. Are you disappointed with the lack of innovation and critical thinking? Are you tired of one size fits all solutions for your brands?

Hans Kaspersetz
And if you are then using data smartly, whether it’s on the language side or on the local content marketing side, you can gain a significant competitive advantage. So the question that we started with is, is this one, it’s pretty simple, why is a smaller Second to Market brand outperforming the category establishing brand on a critical topic such as CGM, which is continuous glucose monitor? And we always like to start with some sort of an insight, something that the data shows sort of leads us to.

Hans Kaspersetz
Right. And so we took a look at 10,000 relevant category keywords and we looked at how the search market has changed, how do people engage with that content? And the first thing that sort of stuck out to us was something that’s changed. So historically, if you were in position one and you’re getting organic search results, you achieved about a sixty five percent click through rate. Today, when we look at that, having looked at these at these ten thousand keywords, the brand actually achieved a 35 percent click through rate on average, but the standard deviation has risen to twenty five points.

Hans Kaspersetz
That means that the click through rate for position one is anywhere from 10 percent to what’s at 60 percent. Right. And that’s a huge variance. And so brands that really chase that first position, you don’t know whether it’s actually worth it until you get there. And oftentimes it’s not. And what we discovered is something really interesting. Woops. Oh, yeah, sorry about that. And so we discovered something really interesting, the click through rate for position one, goes from 10 percent to 60 percent.

Hans Kaspersetz
And when we thought about that, it’s like, well, how do we create competitive advantage knowing that? And we started to look a little bit deeper, deeper at the data. And for these ten thousand keywords, some really interesting things emerged. First of all, in position. One, this particular brand was able to achieve thirty two thousand impressions in seven thousand clicks. Right. So that’s a click through rate of thirty five percent. When we look beyond that and we looked at positions two through six, you see that the impression counts are much, much, much higher and the click through rates are lower, but the absolute clicks are much higher.

Hans Kaspersetz
And so it doesn’t make a lot of sense for this particular brand to be chasing position one all of the time. Right. There’s actually quite a lot of opportunity and positions two through six. Now, the one that really blew our mind was what happens in position seven. And I don’t think anybody ever talks about position seven. But there we, the brand was able to achieve a million won impressions just about and about 6,900 clicks, which is essentially the same number of clicks we had in position one.

Hans Kaspersetz
Now, what’s interesting about that is it’s actually way easier to have a high volume of content in position, say three through seven, than it is to have a very small amount of content in position, one, especially if you’re trying to work on content that’s beyond just branded. So branded, you should always own the first position or the first two positions. But when you adopt LongTail strategies, right. Which is really where you see a lot more sort of buying intent and behavioral intent.

Hans Kaspersetz
You don’t need to be in position, one, you need to be in a position that will drive the most performance for you and get you the most return on investment. So as we were doing this, we were wondering how is it that, you know, let me restate that. As we started to do this, we wanted to share our methodology with you. So how did we actually achieve the results or sort of the insights we’re about to share with you?

Hans Kaspersetz
First of all, we crawled both websites. We scraped all of the content. That was about two thousand seven hundred fifty nine pages of content. And that’s only possible if you have tools to do it right. And there’s very few commercial tools that allow you to do that. Certainly very few commercial tools that will allow you to scrape that amount of content, do topical sort of topical analysis and lexical analysis simultaneously. We then ran our our lexical analysis process and we really determine the relative strengths of each website on the keywords that we cared about.

Hans Kaspersetz
Our word embedding engine discovered approximately one point seven million lexigrams, also known as Ingrams or candidate phrases. So this is just a phrase. This is one, two, three words generally with a noun in it, that is of interest to us. We then categorize them by parts of speech. We look at how they co-occur, we eliminate all the stop words, and then we actually create a useful set of tokens that allow us to visualize these based on their vectors.

Hans Kaspersetz
So in other words, when you look at any phrase, our tool allows us to create 18,000 vectors, which is connections to other phrases, and measure their relative relevance across that entire ecosystem. When we looked at Brand A, the analysis identified more than twenty seven thousand nine clusters or or candidate phrases that included the acronym CGM. There are more than 20 variants of that just on the homepage, right. Now, we all know about keyword packing if you’ve been in the Digital marketing business for a long time and we’re not suggesting that you keyword pack, but understanding the volume of content and the variety of content that you or your competitor is publishing is key to performance.

Hans Kaspersetz
Right. We then went a step further. And this is something that’s not often done, is that our tools allowed us to do what’s called a back link analysis. So we looked at every single website that linked to our Target website, and there were seven hundred and forty unique domain names, so unique websites that linked back. And from those seven hundred and forty websites, there were two thousand nine hundred back links with the acronym CGM in the anchor text.

Hans Kaspersetz
So this means that there’s seven hundred and forty websites that believe that the Target brand website is important on the acronym CGM and this creates a really strong foundation for the brand to publish content on. And it’s a really strong signal to Google as to the relevance and authority of that brand. And so when you look at those things together, volume of content, variety and richness of content. Combined with the back link profile of that content, you start to get a really clear competitive picture. And we do this for lots of different clients because it helps that client understand, can I win in that space.

Hans Kaspersetz
What do I need to do to win in that space? And then what do I need to write about to win in that particular space? And this is applicable for devices, diagnostics and our experience, as well as OTC.

Hans Kaspersetz
What we looked at, Brand B, now this is the category establishing dominant player, right. These guys should have won this particular race. We crawled all of the content and we only identified seventy nine now clusters that included the acronym CGM and this was an acronym they wanted to win on. And the home page had eight very close variants of that acronym. So there wasn’t even a lot of richness in the language. Right. And right away you get this picture right.

Hans Kaspersetz
It’s we choose this example because it’s so incredibly clear. Right. It’s so stark. The difference, right. 27,000 versus 79,000 kind of have a sense for why Brand A is winning. But the story gets really interesting when you go back to that back link and you look at whether or not the market believes that brand A is important on it. And here we discovered one domain name with one back link to Brandy’s website with the acronym CGM in it.

Hans Kaspersetz
So it’s almost as if Brand B decided to cede the dominant position on that acronym. They just didn’t write about it and they just didn’t do any sort of external work to earn back links around that acronym. Right. And so right away, you see this like really sort of stark sort of difference. And ultimately, it’s really important to know these things. As we come into market and we’re launching brands, particularly if we’re launching a Challenger brand. We oftentimes don’t want to go head to head with the dominant brand on a media buy.

Hans Kaspersetz
We might not have 14, 15 million dollars sitting in our bank account to go and buy TV all over the place. So understanding what to write about, how to write about it, what markets to place it in and where to compete becomes really, really important. And the data is available to do that today. So what, right? So we analyzed three thousand Web pages of content, we identified the gaps, we identified some opportunities, we discovered that brand A has a robust content and back link the advantage over brand B.

Hans Kaspersetz
And is there a strategy for Brand B to catch up? Well, of course, there is, right? I mean, ultimately, it sort of comes down to what is your will to win, and do you really want to own that space? If you really want to own that space, then you know what you got to do? You have to build content that’s relevant, holistic and comprehensive on topics so that you become an authority on that.

Hans Kaspersetz
And you can do it in a couple of ways. I mean, you can buy all the paper, click and programatic you want, but the day that you turn off that spend, all of your traffic goes away. You can build a robust content base on that topic, both through disease, state education, branded unbranded, patient content, and bring it together into a network of content that gives you a dominant position. And whether or not you’re running paid search or programmatic or TV, you will still be enjoying a tremendous amount of engagement for many, many years on that particular topic.

Hans Kaspersetz
And it doesn’t get you the results as fast as you might want because you can just turn on a page and turn it off. But it does give you a potential competitive advantage in the market. So where does this plug in, right. It really plugs in just about everywhere across the commercial digital ecosystem. You want sort of instinctually you want to make it about search because that feels natural. But the reality is that doing this kind of lexical analysis and one acronym is one place generally we come up with lots and lots of insights across the entire content landscape from mechanism of action, mechanism, disease, dosing, efficacy, patient support.

Hans Kaspersetz
There’s really insights to be had all over the place. You want to take those insights and then you want to pull them out and really engage your audience in as many places as possible with the right content that is reflective of how they’re communicating and how your competitors are communicating. And we’ve seen really remarkable things by this. You can see the insights make their way into the ICDAs. You can see them get into how the reps discuss the topics with the physicians.

Frank Dolan
You can see it in how we communicate with patients using language that they’re comfortable with. And it does lead to some remarkable results. So I want to come back and sort of give you a little bit of a grounding, we’ve covered a lot of distance here. We’ve covered a number of really complex topics. And I want to contrast. Arteric lexical analysis versus a traditional keyword strategy, just so that you understand that this goes way beyond search, right.

Hans Kaspersetz
In a traditional keyword strategy, your agency or you would go to SEM Rush, or AdWords, or some source and you would pull out all of the keywords that Google suggests and you would rank them based on what the likelihood is that you could compete on them and how much search volume there is. Now, the core challenge with that is that those key words are both abstracted and simplified and grouped in a way that aids Google’s ability to charge you for paper click. They are not reflective of how your audience is actually searching.

Hans Kaspersetz
And that’s a really important thing. And so what it does is it leads brands to chase head terms and chase terms that they probably can’t win on and that it’s unlikely that their customer, their target audience is going to find them on because their target audience is always searching for something much more complex and much more interesting than the phrases and sentences and searches that come out of AdWords and SEM Rush and those tools. Right. Arteric’s lexical analysis does two key things right or a couple of key things, but two things that are really important.

Hans Kaspersetz
Number one, we actually look at the language that’s being used in the market. So we look at the verbatim search data that comes out of AdWords, out of search console, out of Quora, out of Reddit and other sources to map the exact phrasing that our target audiences are using to search for our content. That’s first piece. Right. And rather than using something that’s abstracted and simplified, we actually look at the reflective language and we group it up and then we start to build content from it.

Hans Kaspersetz
Number two, we have the the word embedding analysis tool, that we tool, that goes out and we can put an arbitrary number of websites into it. And one of the concepts that are important here is that anybody who’s in a search result where you want to be is one of your competitors. It’s not just the other prescribed or OTC product or device that you’re competing against. It’s anybody who’s able to get impressions, share in a space that you want to be in, in a semantic space you want to be in.

Hans Kaspersetz
So we might be looking at Cleveland, Mayo, Wikipedia, Medline,etc., etc., etc., to look at the language that’s there. We might be looking at Quora, Reddit, Twitter, even sometimes Amazon, if we’re working for an OTC brand to determine what’s the language that’s being used, what are the strategies around that language, and then what’s the gap or the white space that we can fill and where do we want to go head to head against those things?

Hans Kaspersetz
And how do we build reflective content and really building those sort of that content strategy around the query structure, the actual verbatim queries of verbatim language people are using and looking very closely at the query intent and then aligning the query intent to the customer journey, to the content strategy, creates really remarkable results for our client. And oftentimes a lot more engagement. Finally, this is enhanced dramatically through the optimization process, published content, look at how it performs, adjusts the content, published content, see how it performs, adjust the content and you move on and on and on.

Hans Kaspersetz
And really, we call this practice conversion rate optimization. What actually performs the best in market and what incremental changes can we do iteratively to achieve better and better performance. So what are the results look like? For a typical lexical analysis project where we have a hand in crafting the content and in the agency ecosystem, it actually gets deployed to the websites into the different sort of destinations and the drivers. We oftentimes see upwards of a 42 percent increase in average session duration.

Hans Kaspersetz
We also see an increase of 25 percent in pages per session, and a decrease of 50 percent and bounce rate. The number one reason why is that we are aligning the content with the user’s query intent. So when they do the search, they hit your website. They get the answer on the first try. And then they go on looking for more information rather than getting to the site, not getting the answer, bouncing back to search and then looking at one of your competitors.

Hans Kaspersetz
And that’s one of the strengths of lexical analysis. How do we really align your content with the user’s query intent using reflective language, so that when they arrive on the website and they do an eye scan, they immediately see content that they recognize as satisfying their intent.

Hans Kaspersetz
Number two, we see dramatic increases in sessions, page views and news sessions. And this comes from the fact that when users stop bouncing out of your website, the search algorithms are able to detect that behavioral change, it is a busy signal, but they do use it and they start to prioritize your content because you’re satisfying more users query intent.

Hans Kaspersetz
And so what happens is you are able to expand the absolute count of unique queries you’ll receive traffic on. And you actually see the users going to 2.2, 3.3 pages per session because you’ve satisfied that query intent. Which drives up the session count, the page of your count and the sort of the top of funnel surface that you have access to through the search engines. Now, this is the one that this these are the results that excite me the most. For one of our OTC brands applying these techniques in a single year, we grew their email list by 109 percent.

Hans Kaspersetz
This is a brand that was doing about 70 million dollars a year in revenue. And what we saw was that we increased their email subscriber base from125,000 to 220,000 in a single season. And their season goes from about October to November. And along with that, we saw dramatic increases in coupon usage, click throughs to the online retailers, and sort of all of those sort of side metrics. So sort of meta measures of success for this particular brand.

Hans Kaspersetz
And this really came down to, are we doing a good job of engaging the audience with content they want when they’re at the appropriate stage of their customer journey. Now, out of that, we saw a couple of things. And we’ve had a six or seven year relationship with this particular brand. In the first year, after applying these techniques for this brand, they exceeded their revenue forecasts by 20 percent. Mostly everything else was held equal. The marketing dollars were equal, the amount of TV that ran was equal, sort of the media dollars were equal.

Hans Kaspersetz
And so we sort of attribute some of this to the brand, doing a better job of engaging the audience and some macroeconomic factors. In the second year of this brand, applied these techniques and we applied them for them, the brand exceeded their forecast by one hundred percent, which is a huge growth. Now, obviously, we’re not accountable for all of that and responsible for all that. But the digital work, which was their primary way of reaching their customers, which we handled website paid search, etc., lexical analysis, SEO and all, was the core of their marketing.

Hans Kaspersetz
Right. And so it’s really, really exciting when we see these kinds of things happening. We also helped grow a brand from zero dollars to two point two dollars billion dollars annually using these techniques over the course of 11 years. And it’s just been it’s been a lot of fun. So the results are real and they’re accessible to all of our clients. So what are the measurable benefits? Well, number one, search visibility, and that’s the SEO component.

Hans Kaspersetz
Number two is the engagement and that’s through CRM email, practice share, field share, speakers share, your rep interactions. Number three is conversions. Now, if you’re an OTC brand, it’s a little bit more measurable. But certainly when we look at our HCP work, we see higher levels of request to wrap signing up for for physician support, coupon downloads, co-pay card downloads, all of these sort of indicators that we would use to measure success. We oftentimes see deeper conversations with the field sales team, because they’re using the language that reflects the language of their audience and we’re able to generate local content for them, that’s relevant to their particular physician audience.

Hans Kaspersetz
And finally, like we just talked about, greater revenue.

Hans Kaspersetz
So where do we apply this, right? Really seamlessly integrates across all of your assets, as we showed you before, one of the first places is, hey, what market should we be in? How are those physicians behaving? What kind of insights about their behavior can we use to then shift behavior and engage KOL’s and influencers in that market? When we look at the competitive landscape, what are our competitors doing? How could they be dominant? What can we learn from them?

Hans Kaspersetz
What’s the white space? Where else can we go? And then when we bring all of that together and we start to deploy it across our marketing assets, you see a lot of amazing things happen. And it’s sort of, it excites me, I can’t say it any other way. It’s really exciting to me to have access to such a large database of insights, both on the language side and on the physician behavior side, so that we can build really remarkable assets for our clients.


So in closing, a couple of things. Number one. All health care is local, and so understanding how local impacts, delivery and behavior is really, really important and it gives you a lot of insight about how to connect. Number two, understanding the language that’s being used by your target audience is crucial to success. And it really moves you past that sort of one size fits all, slather the entire country and peanut butter strategy, that we’ve seen for really, really long time.

Hans Kaspersetz
And it plugs into what we call asymmetric launches. And number three, doing local content marketing at national scale enables us to achieve something we call near personal promotion. These are programs that can be scaled and engage on a local basis with influencers and physicians that we really want to target, using content that’s relevant to them coming from people that are relevant to them and influential to them. And it all kind of comes together in a unique set of products and services, that we’re really excited to be developing and bringing to market.

Hans Kaspersetz
So I want to thank the audience for hearing this out. If you’re interested in talking to us about how to do these things or how they can influence your brand, please give Bob a call. Bob Brooks, his phone number and contact information is on screen. And that’s all I got. Thank you so much.

Frank Dolan
Can’t hear you Bob. Oh, sorry about that. How could, how could the world possibly mute me? That’s impossible. My voice is worth listening to, is it not?

Frank Dolan
That’s what Mom said. Hey, Hans, so a couple of things resonated with me. And as someone who’s been a part of a lot of brands in my career, when you were talking about how where you can buy ads, you know, throw money at the problem, but the minute you don’t, the world falls apart.

Frank Dolan
It’s just to me, it just really resonates with me because I do believe anyone can buy reach.

Frank Dolan
But when you buy reach, you live in a world of having to constantly outbid your competitors.

Frank Dolan
But if we really believe as as brand leaders that we’re that were customer centric and we’re going to deliver and delight, what you’re suggesting is like, hey, if you really understand your customer, you’re going to be able to earn that level of engagement because you’re showering them with value. Like, don’t we want to be there standing in plain sight with value for our customer, if we’re trying to deliver on our brand promise?

Hans Kaspersetz
Yeah, so first, Frank, I am a proponent of paid media, like I’m not saying not to do paid media, I think it is a really important tool in our kit of tactical execution.

Hans Kaspersetz
Right. There’s some places we’re just never going to win organically. But I think more importantly, and this is something we talked about yesterday in the panel, an omni channel strategy has to go beyond the pale. It has to go beyond the device. We have one client who’s really, really good at this. They think about how are we going to engage that customer from their very first discussion with their physician, about their heart disease, all the way through transplant and how to live with that new heart valve.

Hans Kaspersetz
And it’s, the content is rich and it’s holistic, and it’s they are the resource for their customer base, whether it’s a doctor or a patient, they’re the authority on it and they’re trustworthy. And so, you know, I remember, I’ll give you one more story and I remember. Several years ago, we were working for a brand and they were having trouble with reimbursement, kind of standard story, everybody has trouble with reimbursement. Right.

Hans Kaspersetz
And we started to do research. And what we did, we were running Lexical analysis. Right. This is like at the infancy of Lexical analysis. And we’re trying to figure out why is it that physicians and their back office teams aren’t finding the reimbursement support information that’s needed. And it turns out that this particular brand labeled all of their content around reimbursement support as formulary coverage. It was all under the formulary coverage, sort of banner of content. And when we went to search, nobody was searching for formulary coverage, and then we started to think and try to discover what was the language that was actually being used by the back office, by the physicians and by the patients to talk about formulary coverage.

Hans Kaspersetz
And it turned out it was health insurance coverage, even though technically it’s not exactly right. And it took us about half a year to convince the MLR team to let us write content about health insurance coverage on the HCP website instead of formulary coverage. And what we actually had to do was write an entire second set of content. We had to leave all the formulary coverage content in place, and then we had to write an entire second set of content and then map all of the new content to the old content and teach Google that formulary coverage and health insurance coverage, were synonyms.

Hans Kaspersetz
It shouldn’t be that much of a struggle, it shouldn’t be a struggle that when you take an insight to the marketing team or the MLR team and say, hey, look, this is how your audience really talks about it, if we want to get the right medical information into the right hands, we need to adopt this language. I have another one where a disease named Bipolar 1 can be written Bipolar Arabic one, or Bipolar Roman numeral one. Clinically correct is bipolar roman numeral one, but if you search for that, none of the consumer oriented bipolar content is available.

Hans Kaspersetz
It’s only HCP oriented content. And so one of the struggles there was convincing that brand, hey, we’re going to write content using two different acronyms for the same disease because we want to reach different audiences in different ways. Can you get OK with that? And it took probably 10 MLR meetings and concept reviews to get that through. Can you imagine what the cost to the organization was just to fight that particular battle? How much political capital was used internally?

Hans Kaspersetz
Which is almost counter to what we’re all saying, we’re like, oh, well, we’re patient centric, we’re audience centric. If that were the case, then why are we fighting these things? So I would challenge our audience to really think about this and to do the hard work to go out and to look at specifically how does your audience talk about these things? What’s the language they’re using? How do we incorporate it into our materials and start that near personalisation process?

Frank Dolan
The most sophisticated brands need to be behind this, and it’s a simple premise to sell it internally. You’re getting closer to really understanding the needs of your customer constituency. I think it’s very, very powerful. So Hans, I do have a question I want to pose to you, which is, with this fascinating capability in the world of different disease states, is this more or less important for things like rare diseases, where some of these the quantity might be less, and people may not be able to articulate part of the problem or to articulate the brand search? Does that make sense?

Hans Kaspersetz
I have to think about that a little bit. 30 seconds? The 30 second answer is it’s crucial whether you’re a giant brand with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis or you’re really small brand like PNH, I mean, a small disease like PNH. The problem is with the PNH audience, the data gets really, really small and it becomes really hard to do a statistical analysis and you get almost too close to the patient. So we run into some privacy issues, but generally speaking, it can be accomplished at both levels and get really amazing insights that will drive better engagement.

Frank Dolan
That’s great. And the next question is to really be able to do an assessment and have a real world view of where a brand sits right now, especially in highly competitive marketplaces. How long does it take for Arteric to be able to do an analysis and to start to deliver some insights that the team can act on?

Hans Kaspersetz
Barring contracting, 60 to 90 days.

Frank Dolan
Really?

Hans Kaspersetz
It really comes down to how fast can you get us all of your market research work that’s already been done. So we don’t tell you something you already know and the tools that we have really accelerate the work. So 60 days or so. Yeah.

Frank Dolan
Oh, that’s incredible. Well, I mean, there’s there’s two forces at work right now. The first is that here we are in the middle of April and I’m getting a lot of feedback on where people are in Q1 against their 2021 goals. And I think that there’s a little bit of consternation out there in and running out of the 2020 mulligan that everyone was given with revising or rescinding forecasts. We’ve got to deliver this year. So the pressure’s on as we enter into Q2 and we think about the year.

Frank Dolan
But the second thing is that we’re not that far away from July, which for me was always doing the brand plan meeting for the following year. So imagine having those insights going into to the summer brand planning sessions. Pretty, pretty important.

Frank Dolan
Well, I want to thank you. You taught us a lot today. This is very, very different than what most folks are talking about. But if you’ve got a responsibility for the brand and you have a real passion for delivering on the brand promise, you need to know about this stuff.

Frank Dolan
So that’s really, really great. Thank you.

Hans Kaspersetz
Thanks for the opportunity, Frank. And I’m available on LinkedIn or by email Hans@Arteric.com.

Frank Dolan
Alright. Well, we look forward to connecting with you on social and in subsequent sessions. So Hans thanks again. Thanks for joining us.

Hans Kaspersetz
Thanks, Frank.

Frank Dolan
Thanks, everybody.

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