Future of Omni-Channel Engagement

Transcription

Frank Dolan
Are your customers listening and how would you know? On our next session, we’re going to talking about omni-channel engagement. It’s a great opportunity for everybody, whether you’re in biopharma or medtech. It’s to think about what are we doing to communicate our value proposition to customers.

Frank Dolan
So in our next panel, we’ve got some incredible speakers who are going to be talking about their thoughts and approaches to these very problems that exist in every single life science company that’s out there; whether you’re pre-commercial and you’re trying to build a marketplace, build interest around the disease, state an area or a therapy, or if you’re a commercial entity with products in the market, and maybe even competitors and you’re trying to stand out.

Frank Dolan
So I want to make sure everyone’s very, very clear. Our incredible panel of guests today are representing their views, not that of their employer. So let’s make sure that we’re very, very clear about that. But let me bring in our first expert speaker. I couldn’t be more thrilled to welcome Jennifer Garvin to the stage. Jennifer is doing incredible things with Digital marketing and beyond at Radius Health. Jennifer, welcome.

Jennifer Garvin
Thank you, Frank. Great to be here.

Frank Dolan
Tell us a little bit about your background, because I know you super, super well. Most of the world knows you super well. But for the three people that don’t. Please tell them about your incredible pharma career.

Jennifer Garvin
Sure. I have around twenty one years of pharmaceutical experience. Held many positions, including sales specialist, trainer, district manager, regional sales manager and most recently a Director at Radius Health. So I have really enjoyed my career and experience. And Frank, I’ve had the pleasure of working with you twice. So really always an honor and a pleasure to see you and be part of this. So thank you.

Frank Dolan
Well, the honor is all mine and the honor certainly continues for all of us as we welcome Dr. Martin Jernigan. So Martin is working as VP of Marketing at Akebia Therapeutics. He’s got a decorated history, at Novo and beyond. But, Martin, it’s always great to see you. Welcome.

Martin Jernigan, PhD
Thank you. Good to be here. It’s exciting times for sure.

Frank Dolan
Very exciting times and exciting times for kind of what you’re up to. I know you’re here with an incredible academic and professional career, but you guys are up to some really exciting things and potential launches and all that sort of jazz.

Frank Dolan
Tell us a little bit about what life is like for you at Akebia right now.

Martin Jernigan, PhD
So I’m virtual as everybody else, but getting ready for a product launch and definitely a lot going on, at our class base. So we’re doing all our scenario planning and trying to drive some of the business in the short run. So, yes, really glad to be here. It’s great company, have to say that.

Frank Dolan
That’s , it is good company and the company keeps on getting better. I want to welcome Rorik from BMS, doing some incredible things worldwide with omni-channel engagement. It’s great to have you here Rorik.

Rorik van Welij
Thanks a lot. Thanks. Thanks for the invite.

Frank Dolan
Tell us a little bit about your background, because your background is really fascinating as I get to know you better.

Rorik van Welij
Yeah, well, where to start? Years ago I started developing my own website, something like 20 years ago. I always had a very strong passion for digital and I really find my momentum in pharma and industry. And I’m really impressed with what we can achieve if we are able to do better customer engagement. Right now within BMS and before that at Amgen where I defined our customer engagement model, supporting processes, rolled out a digital factory in Europe and currently within BMS, I have a global role.

Frank Dolan
Excellent, excellent. Well, thank you for giving your time and your treasures to be here. I really appreciate it. I know everyone here watching certainly does. It’s great to give a nice international perspective in this case, literally with you, with you being here. We all appreciate it.

Frank Dolan
And speaking of time treasures, international and beyond, I couldn’t be happier to share some time with the very own Hans Kaspersetz of Arteric. Hans, we’ve done this a thousand times. We have a lot of fun with this, today’s gonna be fun as well. Welcome, Hans.

Hans Kaspersetz
There you go, that’s it. That’s the first 10 bucks, right? I’m really glad to be here. Glad to be on the panel and looking forward to what we could discuss today.

Frank Dolan
It’s going to be fun, it’s going to be good stuff. Hans has got incredible hobbies. He’s got an incredible view on the world and on what we do in pharma. A really, really unique perspective. On the other side of Covid, when you get a chance to spend some time talking about not just pharma and marketing stuff, maybe talk about diving and other things, Hans is probably the best guess you’ll ever invite to a cocktail party. So that’s for sure.

Hans Kaspersetz
That’s pretty hard to live up to Frank. Thanks.

Frank Dolan
Well, hey, so let’s deliver for our audience today. We’re talking about omni-channel engagement. There’s a lot that’s happening right now. The rules of engagement, as they say, kind of have changed a bit with what’s going on. So Martin, I want to start with you, because you told us a little bit about what you’re up to right now. You guys are thinking about launch, but you’ve launched tons of products before.

Frank Dolan
When you think about the brand planning cycle, the process, the tools, the techniques, I’m sure that there are some things that are different. So let’s wow our audience with the remarkable, not the well known. And give us a little bit of your thoughts around the brand planning process, as you see it now from your very seasoned marketing perspective.

Martin Jernigan, PhD
Well, thanks, Frank. Yeah, I have launched quite a few products. What’s unique is I had 12 years at Novo Nordisk, which is a big company, we have infrastructure all over the place. Now in a small company, we’re kind of building it out. So the learnings for me as we’re going into the brand plan is really that assimilation, the connectivity of the data, putting all those pieces together. So in some ways, we’re kind of starting a bit from scratch. So leveraging that with our HCPs, with our patients and then ultimately getting the connectivity with the rep.

Martin Jernigan, PhD
I know we’ll talk about Covid and the impact, but we certainly are seeing that more the more that you can really harmonize these things, that’s the ultimate goal, as we all know.

Frank Dolan
Excellent, excellent work. Rorik, can I ask you to weigh in as well. I mean, there’s going to be some things that you’re thinking about either adding or integrating when you look at future omni-channel strategies and tactics. What are your thoughts here now?

Rorik van Welij
Absolutely, Frank. I think, first of all, the brand planning process, I don’t see significant changes there. I think we’re still going to be heavily focused on making sure that we have the right strategic imperatives, behavioral objectives, messaging and even think about segmentation. And I think you need to have these basics in place before you can even start thinking about omni-channel customer engagement. So I think the brand planning continue to focus on the basics.

Rorik van Welij
I think that that’s important. And often you still see marketing teams or cross-functional teams even stepping over that first strategic step. Now, to answer your question with regards to omni-channel and what’s next, I think there’s a continuous integration that we’re looking at when it comes to medical, commercial, marketing and potentially even also other functions. So that’s the first given. The other thing I think is, looking after our speed to market. So how can we make sure that we are set up in such a way that we can give our valuable content, available services even faster via the channels that our customers prefer?

Rorik van Welij
And that’s a, I would say, almost like an ongoing challenge that we have. How can we be faster? How could we move from two weeks to one week to five days? That that’s really a big impact that we can make for our local teams and the last the last one. And I think that’s also an ongoing effort, is to do the upskilling and the continuous upskilling of our infield, but also our office functions.

Rorik van Welij
So with the new reality, with Covid, with changed preferences, or maybe our industry getting to know finally better what our customer preferences are, how are we able to deliver against that from an office perspective in close collaboration with our colleagues in the field. So I believe it’s a combination of those three, but at the same time really making sure that you have the basics in place, a good strategy, where one can start to execute against.

Frank Dolan
Excellent. Thank you for that. So, Jennifer, I’d like to bring you up and talk to you a little about, you’ve been through a lot of planning cycles when it comes to products, but also teams and initiatives. When you think about, especially from a key accounts, and a team’s perspective. I mean, the playing fields changed. So are there any things that you’re thinking about that are really different, perhaps when it comes to some of those teams, technology or initiatives, when you think about the next year plus?

Jennifer Garvin
Planning and even strategy, it really is becoming more and more patient focused and patient centric. I think that all companies really have a great intention of doing that, but sometimes that gets lost in translation. And really the ultimate goal is not only to connect with the patient or the HCP, but keep them connected. So whether it’s information on the website or a patient app, the information really has to be informative, meaningful and just entirely up to date.

Jennifer Garvin
I mean, patients are so educated these days. So gone are the days of updating a website once every six months, once every quarter. These things are really done a weekly and sometimes, in cases of a patient app, even daily. So it is not, the times of just being able to present something and not update it, are really a thing of the past. So it really is about that patient engagement and keeping them coming back and wanting more information, because they really see it as a resource.

Frank Dolan
That’s powerful. How can you lose when you bring it back to the patient? I completely, completely agree. So Hans, I’m going to ask you to weigh in on this topic as well. You’re always into tools and technology, but you also have a unique perspective. Without giving away the goose, you have the view of what a lot of brands are doing, both good and bad. When you look across the spectrum, because I know that’s what you guys are up to.

Frank Dolan
So what is a framework for us, as we think about what’s new, what’s needed to have a successful brand planning process moving forward?

Hans Kaspersetz
Yeah, that’s a great question. I’ve been fortunate to support five launches over the last 12 months here in the United States and globally. And the thing that jumps out most to me and the thing I think that Covid really highlighted for us, is that all health care is local.

Hans Kaspersetz
And what that means is that, and we really saw this right, was the tremendous variability in health care delivery and the way patients and brands interact together across the geographies of the United States and even globally. And, you know, it really highlights the fact that, quite frankly, quite often brands suffer the tyranny of averages.

Hans Kaspersetz
And so when you see the variability across the markets, we need new tools and new ways of thinking about how health care is local, how physicians behave in different markets, how physicians interact with each other and influence each other, and then how do patients behave and interact in different markets. The thing that I want to sort of caution us about and really think about, it’s something that I think a lot about, is sort of with the destruction of the third party cookie and sort of this privacy framework that is expanding, that we have these two things that are at odds with each other.

Hans Kaspersetz
Right. We know that we need to be able to communicate locally. We need to be relevant locally, and we need to be able communicate in a language that’s reflective of the language of our audience. Right. I mean, that was one of the items that came up at the very beginning of the first session today. Right. That jingle that failed. And it was because it wasn’t reflective. It wasn’t inclusive. And so as we work on technology, right.

Hans Kaspersetz
I mean, we have products around lexical analysis and sort of to determine and really identify how language is used nationally. And then on the other side, we’ve been building out very large databases of physician behavior in order to understand how different markets behave and how we can influence those markets positively and get the right information, in the right hands. And so this, sort of the world got small and much more sort of personalized or at least nearly personalized over the last year.

Frank Dolan
Great, great insights. So, Martin, I’d love for you to kind of weigh in, going back to your experience, as well as referencing the launch thing. So of the ground that we’ve covered when it comes to planning the future, is there, are there any non obvious items that you’d say, hey, we’ve got an in market product versus a launch where that planning process is different because of what we do and don’t have going for us right now, from a commercial omni-channel and marketing perspective?

Martin Jernigan, PhD
Yeah, that’s a good one, Frank. I’d say that there’s there’s some commonality and some differences. The one thing is just the awareness, right. With the mature brand, you’re trying to get those reminder pieces, whereas in a launch you’re trying to get in their face about something brand new, it’s about the innovation. So I think it’s really having those channels and really thinking through where where you find them locally. I appreciate Han’s point because just looking in the US, don’t quote me absolutely on this, but if I recall, there was a source. So there’s about three hundred different unique markets in the US.

Martin Jernigan, PhD
We know states are driven by insurance, so it’s a local task. So really getting through and finding those right customers is the key. The other part is this, it’s the entire ecosystem, as you would say, buzzword. But it’s the health care provider, those in the office that are also supportive because you have integrated delivery networks, you have in our case, dialysis centers.

Martin Jernigan, PhD
They’re all working together in tandem for the patient. You have caregivers. So there’s still many different avenues. And I think where omni-channel or digital enables us to get more of a reach with economically. So I think that’s the piece to be really thinking about for me in the launches, are how are we going to get to as many eyeballs as we can in as a timely manner as we possibly can.

Frank Dolan
That’s excellent stuff, Martin, thank you very much.

Frank Dolan
All right, Hans, I’m going to bring you back up here. I’m going to T this up, though, with a little bit of a story of something that was shared with me recently.

Frank Dolan
So there is a mid-sized pharma company that went into the pandemic and with a sales force in market products.

Frank Dolan
So for those of us that have been in sales for more than five minutes, we know that there are occasionally these quarterly data updates, that end up hitting the CRM system. And so you have things like rep entered or corrected addresses, and zip codes and all sorts of fun stuff, account associations, you name it. Well, lo and behold, going into Q1, the data fresh came through from the vendor. The CRM got a bunch of stuff that was wiped out.

Frank Dolan
It’d be great if we could really innovate beyond this, for sure. But what happened? The reason why it was more painful this time, is that they lost all of these email addresses that were entered in there. And so essentially, if you think about of all the targets that they had, one hundred percent, only 30 percent of those targets had emails going into the pandemic. So with all of the shutdown, they only had they had less than a third of their targets they could send emails to.

Frank Dolan
OK, it got worse. Why? Because it turns out the brand team, compliance, whatever, whoever you want to point to, gave them five boilerplate emails that the reps had to cycle through trying to engage with these physicians around some of these canned messages. Well, I don’t know exactly how those providers felt about those five e-mail messages cycling through, over the following few weeks. But I know exactly how you feel and I know how I feel when I get these canned, non tailored, horrible emails that are just not engaging.

Frank Dolan
Yet, I’m supposed to walk away and be delighted, or buy something, or click through. No way. No how. So Hans, I’m coming to you.

Frank Dolan
If we know that engaging omni-channel content delivers and delights our audiences, how should we think about that moving forward? Because wow, we’re in a very unique time and not only do we have to do well, but we have to stand out from our peers and our competitors who may not have been delivering and delighting.

Hans Kaspersetz
Wow. So I am guilty of having produced lots of those rep triggered emails and approved messages as an agency, so I know exactly what you’re talking about.

Hans Kaspersetz
And one of the things that we saw, right, from our more responsive brands. You know, it’s really interesting. There’s Challenger brands. There’s going to be blockbuster brands. There’s a sort of small pharma, there’s big pharma. They really behave in different ways. And it’s, a lot of it has to do with their internal infrastructure, and their ability to be responsive. Right. I think we were talking about continuous integration earlier, and this idea that as things move through the pipeline, they become available.

Hans Kaspersetz
The brands that were most successful that we were sort of engaged with all through last year, and particularly we actually launched a multiple sclerosis product in the middle of Covid. Right. Originally, the launch date was March. We moved it back to May or June, and we never had time to change course, really. I mean, really what happened was there was a lot of new sort of rep triggered market, sort of market shaping content that moved into the market in that period of time.

Hans Kaspersetz
And the brands that performed really well were the ones that listened to the field sales team, saw that the bounce rates went up, deliverability went down, sort of there. We saw that there was a crush of email and then started to test and innovate on their messaging. Right. More AB testing on subject lines, more sort of iterating through content. And it’s not just five rep triggered emails. We are getting orders for 12, 15, 17 different rep triggered emails simultaneously by our client.

Hans Kaspersetz
So there would be variety. Now, that’s the first that’s sort of the foundation, right, the next level of that, right, is the ability to have a market intelligence group, either that you’ve contracted or internally that is continuously looking at the data coming out of specific markets, taking your national messaging, building it into modular content, and then placing KOLs or KAMs or even just locally and regionally relevant data embedded into that national content. So that when Dr. Joe opens the email and he sees it’s from Dr. Fred, right down the block, he’s way more, they’re way more likely to engage with it.

Hans Kaspersetz
And so there was both of those pieces. Right. How do we sort of move towards a continuous sort of integration, more content, faster environment, which is something we talked about earlier today. And it’s a challenge. And then the second piece is, how do you build more locally relevant content? We know that when content comes from somebody who’s geographically closer, to somebody else, it’s more likely to be opened.

Hans Kaspersetz
The last thing and this was the thing that absolutely blew my mind, Frank, was we started actually FedEx-ing one pagers to physicians in the middle of Covid, because they don’t throw away FedEx packages. And they engage with the content and it actually has an impact. So Covid actually drove us, like there was this huge crush email, huge crush of Veeva Engage. And then we’re like, well, nobody’s on email anymore. So let’s start using FedEx. And it absolutely blew our clients minds, like when we started to say, hey, let’s FedEx this printed piece.

Hans Kaspersetz
I’m a digital guy. Like, you can imagine what that meeting was like. But it worked. Right. And it still works. So I think being flexible in thought and never being overly attached to any one idea is crucial, If you’re going to be an innovator. And you can innovate in print, as well as you can in digital.

Frank Dolan
Things I didn’t expect to hear today. That is awesome. And by the way, I don’t know if more is better, but I think your point is more relevant, I think it’s better to make an awesome experience. So very, very good stuff. So, Rorik, if I can ask you, we’ve talked about different channels so far. I’d like to go deeper on that. Are there any specific channels that you think are worth other folks considering right now, when it comes to really spurning that type of engagement we want with our different customer constituencies?

Rorik van Welij
Great question, Frank, and I think that’s a question I’ve been asked quite a lot over the last few months.

Rorik van Welij
What else can we do? And I have to admit, I wasn’t as creative Hans to come up with the FedEx here, in our Ex-U.S. markets. But I do appreciate the thinking and I will bring it home to some of our teams. And I’m a big believer, though, of making sure that the channels that our customers are preferring are the channels that we are actually filling with relevant content.

Rorik van Welij
And it sounds relatively easy, but it’s much more difficult to do. I believe that if we’re able to bring relevancy in those channels and that can be based on segmentation, it can be based on the adoption letter or simple information that a rep will tell us. We are able to give that unified experience across the different channels. So I’m very grateful as well for Hans to start with these five simple rhetoric and emails initially, because that is the first set of data that we can really start to build upon, if that’s the case, to make the next wave of content even more relevant and even more tailored.

Rorik van Welij
And the big question that might come next is how we will, how will we get there? And to me, that’s all about modular content.Hans also briefly alluded to to the need to start thinking about modular content. But in an ideal world, we would be really looking at how can we bring the content based on these preferences of our customers, in the channel that they will consume by themselves or the channels that we’re pushing. And that might well be the email from the rep.

Rorik van Welij
That might well be the email coming from our office based themes. The integration of the channels, the relevancy of the content. I think that’s where you’re going to see the biggest, the biggest impact. Although I appreciate the FedEx and I definitely want to keep in the mix, but those companies who are really able to deliver that integrated experience will be the winners of the future.

Frank Dolan
That’s great. Thank you. Thank you.

Martin Jernigan, PhD
It’s the snail mail on steroids. Now, you’re going to FedEx. So I remember the days when we used to do all the mail stuff. That’s really good. I’m stealing that one too. Thanks, Hans.

Frank Dolan
Good, good stuff. So, actually, Martin, I’m going to stick with you and then I’m going to ask Jennifer to top us off on this. You know, I mean, I think about what I’ve heard you speak on in the past and the depth of knowledge you have in marketing.

Frank Dolan
I am very empathetic to the number of tools and tactics that you’ve enabled others with, whatever constituency that may be. And when we think about omni-channel marketing, we think about these different tactics and you’re providing these things that could create value. I want to talk a little bit about implementation. So while we’re focusing on some different channels, more than we did previously. While we’re exploring some new tools and tactics as well, can you give us kind of like the leaders guide on how you think about handing this tool to others and making sure that they’re implementing that effectively?

Martin Jernigan, PhD
Yeah, thanks, Frank. The tools are involved for sure, from our perspective that because, I’ll go back to this, sorry. I’m starting from scratch where I am right now. So to me, it’s really all about prioritization. It’s about taking those incremental steps with the implementation to make sure that there’s a clear path that everyone knows how it all works together and why we’re going at it from these different channels and perspectives. So for, from my perspective, it really is that prioritization piece.

Martin Jernigan, PhD
It really is figuring out where we can get the most bang for our buck, how we’re going to coordinate and organize these things. And I know the panelists here have a lot of, honestly, have a lot more detailed impact on that. I’d say I’m a bit more of the generalist here. But what I would say is that it’s really that clarity of focus on the messages. It’s getting the collateral where, you know, you can get the most out of it.

Martin Jernigan, PhD
And as it’s already been said, it’s the refresh, it’s the repurpose. And it’s the making that you’re, making sure that it is relevant. I think we all get the emails on, or the messages on LinkedIn. And I think we all that kind of experience when the not going there, swipe left or right. So I think it is really just making sure that, you know, what your what your overall strategy is, and everybody knows their role and what they have to do to get it done.

Frank Dolan
That’s great. So so, Jennifer, implementation tips and tricks.

Jennifer Garvin
It really is about focus and clarity and having things being meaningful and for implementation, Frank, I think you know me so well. It’s all about the patients. And I think when organizations lose sight of that, our HCPs see it, the patients see it. And then as an organization, we lose that passion, because we know we’re not being patient focused.

Jennifer Garvin
So I love that clarity piece and just keeping things streamlined, because when you have too many messages out there, that definitely gets lost in translation. So for me, it’s keeping it simple, clear and always about the patient.

Frank Dolan
Outstanding, so Hans, I’m coming back to you. And here’s where it would be great, your observations and, or advice, you get to choose. Not everything is simple to implement in a life science organization. Your thoughts, advice, tips, tricks, observations, on implementation of these initiatives inside a life sciences company.

Hans Kaspersetz
Yeah, I’ve been really fortunate. I started working on OTEZLA in 2011, and I got to watch Celgene grow up around that product on the I&I side. And I’ve worked in a number of organizations where they went from 30 people to 300 people. And it really does come down to prioritization, which I think we’ve already talked about, and understanding which markets you’re going to have the most impact on. And I’m going to avoid talking about the Novos of the world and the Becton Dickinsons of the world, and really well structured big companies.

Hans Kaspersetz
Right, because they do have a lot of support and they actually know how to do this. I mean, one of the most interesting things is when you watch a new biotech trying to launch a product, versus a company that’s launched many, many products. How they, how bringing people over from different companies changes the trajectory of the launch and how they come to market. And this is really, really sort of when you’re launching a Challenger brand, and you probably can’t afford to go into every market simultaneously, and slather the entire country in peanut butter with a giant TV campaign.

Hans Kaspersetz
And you need to affect what we call an asymmetric launch. Right. And so be able to come down from the whole country, to look at 200 markets, which is a lot; and then down to that 30, 20 markets, that are going to have a tremendous impact in that launch trajectory in the beginning. And getting focused in a way that enables you to understand who are the influencers in those markets, what are their patterns and their behaviors, and then how do we engage with that and be complementary to what’s happening already. Rather than, kind of changing how the entire world works.

Hans Kaspersetz
I mean, I happen to be working on another launch, which is very, very big, which actually requires the way health care is delivered to change significantly. And I mean, it’s a huge lift, right. It’s very, very difficult. We’ve been working on it for quite a while now. And so I would just sort of come back to this idea of focus, and sort of being relevant, and being local. All health care is local at this point.

Frank Dolan
Focus, relevance and local. OK, so let’s talk about the future states and maybe what we could do is take this one piece at a time. So Rorik I was going to ask you, when you think about the future state of marketing, when you think of the future state of omni-channel, maybe we could take it from the outside. So from a customer’s point of view, what do you think they’re going to say that our omni-channel engagement looks like in the next three to five years?

Rorik van Welij
That would be about a seamless experience, Frank. In three to five years from now. I hope we are from an industry perspective, at such a point that our internal functions are truly aligned, when it comes to how we actually engage customers. You just set the omni-channel marketing.

Rorik van Welij
I think we should be really thinking about cross-functional customer engagement or cross-functional omni-channel customer engagement. A lot of our teams are making great progress when it comes to cross-functional working, making sure that medical, as well as commercial are closely involved. That’s an excellent first step. We also have the marketing sales medical teams, but also consider market access and corporate affairs, when you think initially about HCP, and HCP customer engagement.

Rorik van Welij
I think the future will be much more on integrating patient engagement as well. So what we are now learning, especially in Ex-Ex-U.S. markets, is primarily focused on HCP engagement; making them the center of actually how we work and how we deliver content and services. In parallel, we are working on patient, patient experiences, the patient services and beyond. In three to five years, I really hope we can integrate them so that what we deliver from an HCP is directly relevant for the patients that we’re actually serving. That’s a very long way to go because I think we’re still trying to get excellent in how we engage HCPs. Bringing depth and integrating those with how we are delivering products, services and beyond to patients. That integration, I hope I can play a big role in making that happen, Frank.

Frank Dolan
That’s awesome. That’s great perspect. I really appreciate that. And Martin, I’m going to ask you to maybe give us our internal view and I’ll start off by T-ing you up.

Frank Dolan
I know when I look back three to five years, on some surveys we did inside of our pharma company, one thing that was really clear is that most of our customer facing individuals, medical affairs or sales, in reality said they used maybe 20 to 25 percent of the data resources that we provided. That would have been mapping the customer journey, customers interacting with live events, virtual events, interactions with MSLs, sales folks, digital marketing efforts. They were only looking at about a quarter of the data.

Frank Dolan
Now, I don’t really know what that looks like today in someone’s organization right now. But if I were to go to the dream organization, in three to five years, Martin, what do you think internally, folks would say omni-channel engagement and implementation really looks like?

Martin Jernigan, PhD
Yeah. So the ideal to me would be, well orchestrated. When you think about, as a, as again, I’m building this capability up now, is having that data integration. As you’re saying, if you’re not using it, then why collect it? Right. So my view is, in five years we should have this map, if you will, that’s very clearly laid out, of how we’re interacting with our customers.

Martin Jernigan, PhD
You know, who’s buying in, who’s not. That segmentation piece that Rorik talked about is critical, because each of those groups will have a different buzz, buzz word or different buttons to push. So I think that when we get to five years from now, that’s what it’ll feel like and look like. I think it was maybe even in one of these programs with you, Frank, the quote was, we’ve had 10 years of evolution in one year because of Covid.

Martin Jernigan, PhD
I was part of a pilot, where we were trying to deal with white space physicians, because you just couldn’t drive five hours in Wyoming, to get to them. And it was very, looking back on it now, it’s very antiquated. When you look at the technology moves, when you look at how video can work, the fact that we’re having this great discussion on this platform, I think we’re going to see it even more and more advanced. And it’ll iterate based on the technology, based on the data.

Martin Jernigan, PhD
And we haven’t said the data scientist yet, but that’s still an area that we need more time and effort, to really get that skill set put in place.

Frank Dolan
That’s great. Thank you very much. So Hans, let me ask you, what tools, initiatives or resources do we need to make a delightful future a reality?

Hans Kaspersetz
Thanks, Frank. So a couple of things, right, we have, we face continuous disruption on the technology landscape and on the tracking landscape, I think the privacy, sort of evolution of privacy, is really, really important. One of the things we’ve been working on since about 2016 is a lot of natural language understanding, natural language processing. And that really has two core components. One is thematic analysis. So topic modeling. And then the other piece is lexical analysis, where we’re looking at the actual language people are using.

Hans Kaspersetz
The reason this is crucial, is that as we lose the ability to identify individuals online, because the third party cookie goes away, we end up with cohort based analysis. We actually need a different way to think about how people engage with content. And that’s where thematic analysis comes in. Right. So we want to understand who’s our audience and what are all the different kinds of themes that they’re interested in. So that when a piece of content is shared, we can do a quick analysis on what that theme is and then place the right kind of advertising or promotional material next to it.

Hans Kaspersetz
Right now, that’s a big sort of thing that’s happening right now and is going to really drive the next three to five years. So it’s like, I wish we could have these like comprehensive maps of how people interact with us. But not all of the players in this space cooperate, Google, Bing, Apple, etc., right. The second, so when we, so given that idea. Right. The other thing that we’re really working on is, we’ve been fortunate to build a database of about 1.2 million providers with about 800 million rows of data associated with them.

Hans Kaspersetz
And this is everything from referral behavior and referral patterns, to diagnosing behavior, prescribing behavior, census related data, thematic and interest engagement data; so that we can build sort of audiences that we can then subsequently go and target and sort of understand what they care about. And there’s lots of data sources for that as well. So as people continue to engage with social media and we have different kinds of platforms, that will drive into that data set. And so I think the thing that brands really need to think about is, when they hire an agency or they hire a partner. How smart is that partner? Right.

Hans Kaspersetz
Not how good is the creative, because the creative and the content is often ephemeral. Right. It changes very, very quickly. What the question is, do they have a really robust data set? Do they know how to use that data set? Can they bring insights forward from that data set? And then do they build content and messaging based on the science from that data and from those insights? And I think that’s the thing that that we’re really focused on.

Hans Kaspersetz
And when I come back to that idea of an asymmetric launch, right. Asymmetric launches are driven by the ability to do this analysis at the local level, at the physician level, at the really, sort of, as close to our target as possible. So that as we put a message in front of somebody, we know whether they clicked on it, we know what the theme was. We know how whether they click through to a landing page and then we know whether they asked the rep about it.

Hans Kaspersetz
Very, very powerful information. And then when you share that across your organization; let’s say you have a portfolio of products, right. So you have several products in inflammatory disease and you want your brand sharing the information about their rheumatologist that they’re targeting. What do they care about? When do they care about it? When do they engage with CME? What do they engage with, when they engage with CME? So there’s a lot of sort of things that we have opportunities to look at that will drive us forward over the next five years.

Hans Kaspersetz
Excellent, Hans. That is really, really cool stuff. And you said being able to know things. I can’t emphasize enough, that our industry has a history of being data rich and knowledge poor, and knowing, putting action and intention behind that data. It’s just so important. The other thing that’s really important, based on our roundtable we had with a bunch of C Suite executives at different biopharma companies recently was, whereas 2020 from an omni-channel marketing perspective, perhaps was more of the year of the pilot.

Frank Dolan
As much as so many of us don’t like either the word pilot or the word pivot, but the word that they emphasize for 2021 is performance. So I’d like to go to Rorik, Martin and then Jennifer, we would love your advice. If we are going to truly perform with omni-channel marketing and engagement moving forward, what advice do you give the industry right now, to be able to truly perform in a unique time? Rorik, take it away.

Rorik van Welij
Great question, Frank. And for me, I’d like to focus on three things, having three things right. I think it’s almost like a summary of what we’ve been discussing today.

Rorik van Welij
The first one is making sure that you have a customer centric go-to market model. A model supported with global capabilities or regional capabilities, that can deliver this digital only, but also the face-to-face only, or a very nicely integrated customer engagement. It’s a model that can push, but also pull at the right moment in time. So that’s the first one. Really, truly customer centric go-to market model.

Rorik van Welij
The second one that’s I think where Hans was talking about as well, a harmonized customer 360. Pooling all the data available internally, ideally, also what you can find externally, in a compliant way, to make sure that you have that visibility in the field, in the marketing teams, in the other teams, where you can share your data with. So that you’re sure that what you’re delivering is bringing value. And if not, you’ll be making sure that you use the data and bring value in any next engagements. So that’s the second one.

Rorik van Welij
And the third one that goes across this, is change management. Getting change management rights. Because indeed, we’re really pushing our teams to become more digital, at the same time, if we really do our best, if we really try to upscale them, to really make sure that this is a sustainable change and not just the force that we are applying on them.

Rorik van Welij
And then my key question that I am asking myself, and I would encourage all of you to ask in a global function. Have your markets really served as your voice of the customer? So make sure you have that open dialog going on. And if you’re in a market, then make sure that you follow the voice of the customer. Right. That’s directly the patient or indeed the health care provider. And that will make sure you’re always right.

Frank Dolan
That is awesome. By the way, I hope everyone took notes, because those are three powerful points, and a really important kind of like, self reflecting question, that if you’re in a leadership position, you’ve got to be asking. That’s outstanding. So, Martin, let’s build on that. Your thoughts and advice.

Martin Jernigan, PhD
Yeah, thanks, Rorik. That was so well said. I don’t know where to take it from there. But what I will say is it really comes back to, again, that performance is going to be a function of your execution. And the the quote is, I’d rather have a mediocre strategy with excellent execution, versus the other way around. I think that what’s in front of us and going back to this market concept. I don’t know if you guys have had the same experience, but I had a regional marketing function before and I’ve seen them come and go, come and go, come and go.

Martin Jernigan, PhD
So I think part of it is the local market piece that’s really going to help with the performance, because I have envisioned that instead of them being regional marketers, because that was a weird role, and you’re kind of in between sales and the central marketing. But it’s really that empowerment, down to that regional manager, to be thinking of it and owning that geography; for both, the face to face, as well as the digital long term. That’s going to mean some skill adjustments and skill training.

Martin Jernigan, PhD
So the change management that was referenced by Rorik, that’s how I would build on on that piece. That’s where I see us going. But it’ll take some time to get there. Faster the better, though, right. Like today.

Frank Dolan
No doubt about it. So Jennifer, advice as we all share that sense of urgency.

Jennifer Garvin
So love the comments by both prior. I’ll take this from a field perspective and any some advice I could give any company, is going back to basics. Don’t forget to train your sales force on how to use the technology, how to make sure it’s seamless for the customer. Because you’re right, Frank, 2020 was like the pilot of digital, but it’s not going anywhere, for sure.

Jennifer Garvin
And I think the better the sales force is just prepared and able to use the technology, no matter what it is, the more seamless it is and more impactful for the customer. I think I had some really key learnings in 2020, and assuming that the sales force is just really proficient and good at that, is not always the case.

Jennifer Garvin
So that would be advice I would give any organization.

Frank Dolan
Well great advice for sure. So for anyone that wants to keep up with this incredible panel of individuals. Hans, where can we find you?

Hans Kaspersetz
You can email me at hans@arteric.com, or you can check us out at Arteric.com.

Frank Dolan
Outstanding. And Jennifer, can we connect with you on LinkedIn?

Jennifer Garvin
Absolutely, would love to.

Frank Dolan
That’d be great. And Rorik, how do we how do we track these amazing insights that you’re dropping on us.

Rorik van Welij
Thanks, Frank. And I think there are not a lot of Roriks around, so just try your luck.

Frank Dolan
Alright. Well, we’ll roll the dice and win big. That’s awesome. And, Martin, how about you?

Martin Jernigan, PhD
Yeah, LinkedIn. I was joking about the swipe left on the sales pitches, but I’d definitely like to connect, you know, and sometimes there’ll be opportunities for panels like this again. So I’d say any time. Matter of fact, I really get something out of these every time. So please feel free to reach out.

Frank Dolan
Well, we certainly do appreciate. Well, on behalf of the entire audience, so Rorik Martin, Jennifer, Hans, thank you for your time and treasures.

Frank Dolan
It means a lot. It’s an important year for all of us. Q-1 is in the books, and we’re hearing that everyone’s feeling the pressure of delivering an amazing 2021. And to a point that each of you made, if we deliver in a real customer centric manner, that delivers and delights, every brand’s going to be successful. So on that note, I want to thank everybody for joining us today. We very much appreciate it. We’ll see you in the next session.

Hans Kaspersetz
Thanks, Frank.

Martin Jernigan, PhD
Thanks, Frank.

Rorik van Welij
Thank you all. Bye bye.

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